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were not prepared for that. ongoing litigation. it was constantly, election administration was constantly embattled in a court. courts would intervene, state supreme court would make an emergency decision that secretary of state would decide whether to appeal the decision. it caused a lot of inconsistency and uneasiness going into the election not knowing how our provisional ballot would be counted, not knowing if it was a poll worker's responsibility or the voter's responsibility to fill out the provisional envelope, not knowing if we would have extended hours or weekend hours, preparing all that transcended into our budget, transcended into issues, do we have additional parking, do we get more temporaries, do we open in house voting stations, all contingent on the turnout. that would be at the board based on those decisions. in litigation, out comes by the secretary of state and other interested parties. early voting became a hot-button issue in ohio. that is one event. recommendations as an election administrator, the need to -- for consistent uniformity across the state
roosevelt was elected to president of the united states and became known among many things as the conservation president. it was his vision as president that jumpstarted the preservation movement in this country and gather here today we continue on with the effort to develop public policy that promotes the same ideals as tr did long ago. i have the privilege of being able to absorb what roosevelt experienced as i walk on the very same lands and see the same views he did so long ago. it was my time as governor of north dakota for a saturday to understand the public policy can be used to nudge along the same ideals and help conserve the foundations of our country. when i shared the western governors association, the group of 18 states goes from the country west, very involved in resource issues, we were shepherding the grand canyon visibility study. i was shocked when a regional epa administrator can then and was promoting the idea that north dakota should clean up the air better. i pointed out north dakota was the first state to meet the clean air standards, i was mining and
is election day, and campaigning and elections make for uncompromising mind is that you stand on your principles and mobilize the base and to roll in and endless amounts of money. the 24/7 news cycle covers politics if it is a race and the horses are on steroids and it is all the money coming in on the campaign, so what we mean by the uncompromised mind set is a mindset that is geared towards elections and not towards governing. >> president gutmann, you write that you and your co-author dennis johnson as we observe the changing scene in american politics we came to believe the general problem could be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution the united states congress. why is that? >> well, if you want to see the problem with the uncompromised might set look no further than the congress, the 112 congress in washington. gridlock nothing gets passed. the least legislation in the last 50 years, and why? because everybody is campaigning all the time. there is very little relationship across the aisle, and we went out to the brink of the debt ceiling crisis before compromise
decision in the wake of president obama's re-election. the republican party is divided. that's being isolated and ignored by the right wingers. that's a problem for the gop. that southern dominance may sentence the entire party to irrelevance. >>> conservative ideologues are itching for another fight with president obama, this time saying they may shut down the government altogether or risk a credit catastrophe. could somebody remind these guys who won the election, again. >>> plus, the nra has made its position clear. the answer to gun violence, more guns. we have evidence that posting armed guards everywhere has the exact opposite effect. the latest battle lines as the obama administration moves to curb the availability of assault weapons. >>> let me finish with why this nomination of chuck hagel should be given a solid, solid chance, and this is "hardball," the place for politics, >>> hillary clinton is back at work at the state department. this morning she chaired the weekly meeting of the department's leadership team, and one thing on the agenda will be testifying on capitol hil
davis ever when an actual election? >> he was a senator. wesson elections were -- and he was nominated in a constitutional convention as a moderate in montgomery alabama in february of 1861. i don't think he ever did stand for election. one of the things americans think, one of the things they're told, the confederate constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution, but it was not. a number of crucial changes, and one of them was they had a one-term executive, and i believe it was 5-year executive term. he avoided reelection. >> professor mccurry, did -- was there a lot of political infighting during the war? >> yes. there was. and there were no for more -- for all political parties. one of the things that is interesting is that it so quickly became on the ropes that a lot of things that were planned never really materialized. and there was political opposition, but it was theoretically everybody was a democrat. there was no republican party. no republican party ticket offered in the south. you could not vote for lincoln. but there were all lined with the southern wing of the democ
was indistinct, and even as late as the election of 1860, although lincoln, i think, very powerfulfully and the republican party tried to make a case for -- i think it's more of a political construction and a reflection of the reality. >> host: we talk a lot today about red states and blue states. but there are a lot of conservatives in california and a lot of liberals in texas. >> guest: absolutely. >> host: was it the same with slavery? was there a lot of sympathy towards the institution of slavery? >> guest: more to the point, the democratic party was probably -- up to the election of 1860, during the period of popular elections for national office -- was the majority party in the united states. and it washat was devoted to what we might call state rights, and local control. and they put together a coalition that included slaveholders in the south and a hole variety of people in the north, including urban laborers who were pushing back against the centralization of power. think what is true is state right sentiment was widespread. some sympathy for secessionism was sufficiently wides
of the seven u.s. presidents re-elected since world war ii have been less popular in the second terms. so can the president use early momentum to push the policy agenda? let's spin. guys, i have been saying for a while now i think that his second term he's going the see a lot more pushback from the friends on the left than his foes on the right. for one, he's been re-elected. i think the gop has generally resigned themselves to the fact that they're going to be four more years to obama and they have a little less incentive to hang him for every misstep he has but democrats are incentives to watch him more carefully. one, payment, you know, a number of groups, unions for one, invested heavily in barack obama's re-election and i'm sure they want some roi now. two, accountability on the promises the president made in the first term, promises on gay marriage, promises on immigration, maybe promises on guns now. and third, this idea of a liberal legacy. think i that a number of folks on the left were willing to forego or ignore some of the issues in his first term that now they're looking at. the
ben cramer wrote "what it takes," a thousand-plus page book about the 1988 presidential election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis, and george herbert walker bush. nbc first read calls it the unofficial textbook of washington. if you haven't read it, then you don't get it. richard ben cramer was 62. we'll be right back. ♪ i have direct deposit on my visa prepaid. my paycheck is loaded right on my card. automatic. i am not going downtown standing in line to cash it. i know where my money is, because it is in my pocket. i got more time with my daughter, we got places to go. [ freeman ] go open a new world, with visa prepaid. more people go with visa. >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been 25 days since the shooting in newtown, connecticut, and two years since the massacre in tucson that left six dead and injured u.s. congresswoman gabrielle giffords. the vice president is spearheading a gun control task force in response, and outside organizations are organized to make sure this time gun laws are strengthened. g
election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis, and george herbert walker bush. nbc first read calls it the unofficial textbook of washington. if you haven't read it, then you don't get it. richard ben cramer was 62. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been 25 days since the shooting in newtown, connecticut, and two years since the massacre in tucson that left six dead and injured u.s. congresswoman gabrielle giffords. the vice president is spearheading a gun control task force in response, and outside organizations are organized to make sure this time gun laws are strengthened. gun control advocates are up against a vehement and sometimes incoherent opposition. one example, alex jones, who has called for piers morgan to be deported because of his positions. last night morgan asked jones why. take a look at the face on the pro-guns side. >> we did it to point out this is globalism, and the mega banks that control the planet and brag they have taken over in bloomberg, ap, reuters, you name it, brag tha
" a thousand-plus page book about the 1988 presidential election. the book chronicled the personalities and idiosyncrasies of candidates like bob dole, mike dukakis and george ber hert walker book. it's the unofficial textbook of washington. if you haven't read it, then you don't get it. richard ben cramer was 62. we'll be right back. i had pain in my pelvic area... and bleeding that wasn't normal for me. she said i had to go to the doctor. turned out i had uterine cancer, a type of gynecologic cancer. i received treatment and we're confident i'll be fine. please listen to your body. if something doesn't feel right for two weeks or longer, see your doctor. get the inside knowledge about gynecologic cancers. knowing can make all the difference in the world. [ male announcer ] the exclusive air suspension in the 2013 ram 1500. ♪ engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. >>> welcome back to "hardball." it's been 25 days thins the shooting in new toup, connecticut, and two years since the massacre in tucson that left
champion in the years to come. to have some kind of revolution but when the next election for speaker happens to republican conference conservatives especiallespeciall y within the caucus will remember how cantor handled the fiscal cliff and that may help them. there were other high-profile republicans who voted it had interestiinteresti ng votes. paul wright in the house voted for it. marco rubio on the senate votes no on it. what he think the implications are about? >> guest: to see there are 2016 implications is a little far-fetched but if you love politics you have to look at it. when i was inside of the house chamber watching the fiscal vote, he really is a power player within the party. one of the most important things he is done since the campaign is aligned himself for speaker john boehner and a lot of people did not expect this. one of the the reasons his dumbest and i've spoken people who are close to right write is he wants to make 2013 if budget year. in order to do that he needs boehner support so i don't think ryan will actively break with boehner. >> guest: we have not
and haurlting deportation of illegal immigrants just prior to the election. in the wall street journal he explains why republicans must embrace immigration reform. 70 percent of the 12 and a half latino voters cast votes for the president in the last election. quote, i think it's a rhetoric by a handful of voices in minority but loud nonetheless that allowed conservatives are anti hispanic and anti immigration. i don't think there's a lot of concern in this country that will somehow get over run by ph.d.'s and entrepreneurs. marco rubio sees this as a gateway issue for hispanic voters that could lead to migration for the republican parties if successful. if they want to over hall they need to convince big labor to go on board. >>> thanks so much. >> now it is my turn. >> thank you, jennifer. immigration will be the only tough fight ahead. president obama's promise he will tackle gun control in his second term and something that has already drawn fierce criticism. two of the cabinet picks will face confirmation battle. he will have to negotiate on the debt ceiling and see queststration. he
of 201. baseball elects no players to the hall of fame. jason star will talk about why this hand and what it means. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ "southern wild." >> "silver linings playbook." >> "zero dark thirty". >> "lincoln." steven spielberg and kathleen kennedy producers. >> "les miserables." >> "life of pi." ang lee. >> "amore" nom noise
of americans all across this country and people around the world. and elected officials, i think, are really paying a lot more attention to this and then taking action. the leadership that is already come forward by president obama and then his asking vice president biden to take on this issue, the vice president's record is clear in terms of public safety and taking swift action to make america much safer. the vice president has been working this issue since the president asked him to jump on it, virtually, every day. so i think this is a unique moment. democrats, republicans, mayors, governors and we hear from the president and vice president. the vice president is having these meetings. he talked about what happened earlier today. something good is going to happen out of an incredible tragedy in connecticut and the tragedies that mothers and fathers and sisters and brothers and neighbors experience on a daily basis all across the cities of the united states. >> that's what i want to address. because newtown absolutely a despicable, unthinkable act. but we've been seeing in cities across t
writers association had 37 candidates to choose from and elected none, zero, a few players had the whiff of steroids but should that have kept them out of the hall. jason stark doesn't think so. he wrote with cooperstown, quote, if it is a cathedral, not a museum, we are going to have to throw out gaylord perry, sorry, gaylord and everyone that corked a bat or scuffed a ball or used an amphetamine and everyone that was an off the field scoundrel. good morning, jason. >> hi, carol. >> you are one of the sports writers with the power to get someone into the hall. as you sat down with the ballot this year, was it the most agonizing ever? >> absolutely the toughest ever. i actually went and looked at every single ballot since the beginning of hall of fame voting in the 30s i think this was the most star-studded ballot in like 75 years. it's really incredible to think that we elected nobody. we had a candidate that hit more home runs than anybody that ever lived in barry bonds. we didn't elect him. we had a pitcher in roger clemons who won, at the time he retired, more games than any right-ha
of this president. we probably will start right away recruiting challengers for the next elections. local union leaders, local party officials, and activists. we would happily send out an e- mail in the district to those who support medicare and social security and medicaid cuts. host: have you ever want that at some members of congress? guest: we have launched it publicly in the more generic sense, saying this is a warning. we want to be transparent. we don't learn from this nuclear war. for someone like me woke up every day in 2008 and thought, what can i do today to get barack obama elected president. he publicly admitted that he put social security benefits on the table. that's not a position i want to be in and not what i worked for and to thousand eight. host: did you work for it in 2012? guest: our organization prioritized congress in 2012. our number one candidate was elizabeth warren. she's already been told, calling out aig and big wall street bankers yesterday. we raised $1.5 million from grassroots contributions in this last election cycle. we raised $100,000 before she even announc
credit quality. well, we have an election two weeks from today, and american voters have a clear choice. are they going to vote for greater government support for such assistance? or are they going to let the private sector manage on its own? and i think there's an indicator of the right way to go, all we have to do is look at north dakota. north dakota where the unemployment rate is 3%, because of all the hydrofracking of oil and natural gas that is going on, on privately held land. every state wants to be like north dakota. and it's interesting that mitt romney would dissolve the decision as to whether to explore on land or not to the individual state, he let each individual state decide. so virginia, for example, the one to look for oil off its coast would be allowed to do so. that was revoked by the obama administration even though it was granted by the bush administration previously. alaska wants to do more oil exploration. everybody wants to get sources of energy in their state. so not going to be able to get the job of getting it out go but also to attract chemical manufacturing
, such that they have to, you know, that's what they need to do to win their go into general election they will he' lose to more moderate sounding democrats on this issue, and that democrats retake control of the house? >> well, i'd like to see harry reid with so many of his members from red states vulnerable in the coming election, and like to see the response he gets if he proposes to bring forward any serious gun restriction. i don't think it's coming out of the senate. i think too many in the senate majority leader's caucus would say no thank you, no thank you, mr. reid, the chances of a vote coming in the house-- >> see you soon. fly-over country or the heartland. in colorado, a state that's seen its fair share of tragic shootings, the state's legislature is considering several bills to regulate guns. as lawmakers worked earlier this week, 150 worried guns rights activists quietly marched outside to protest the still unwritten been control measures. here is more from the new democratic speaker of the house and some in the crowd. >> a lot of these things can be preempted or eliminated altogether if
and says he's ready to be tough on gun control but remember the president doesn't have to worry about re-election ever again. so expect his second term agenda to look a lot like this. full of overtures to the base which criticized him over the last four years for caving to republicans. to help decipher what to expect in the next four years, we start with nbc's peter alexander outside of the white house and "the washington post" david nakamura. peter, look, you could describe the first term and the first few months since being re-elected as a confident obama. making bold cabinet picks. laying out a very ambitious agenda, adding gun legislation to the docket or you could describe it as almost confident. you know, he backed away from the susan rice pick. he gave in on taxing the top income earners at the rate he wanted. and so far he's really just tiptoed kind of cautiously around gun control. so this a confident obama based on the agenda you're seeing or a caution one? >> reporter: focusing on foreign policy, i think you'd have to say this is a confident president obama right now. just consider the
've got to say, if you look at how the republican party reacted the first time president obama was elected, i wrote a book that basically could be boiled down to don't lose your -- al roker at the white house. >> exactly. >> they didn't listen. they went out, they engaged in birtherism, they called the president a racist who hated all white people, and they went so far right and so extreme that they lost middle america. and so yeah, we lost another presidential election. look at the cover of "drudge" which i think magnificently reflects the feelings of conservatives, where the conservative movement is. and you know, he links stories that people want to see, and he does it better than anybody else. this weekend, i went on "drudge." and at the top of it is a story of survivalists. that are buying property, arming themselves and building walls out west. you have sean hannity who is talking about secession. you have another talk radio host whose name isn't even worth mentioning that is talking basically about -- about how the federal government is coming in and taking weapons, you know. there'
't going to be done until the next election or until something else changes. this is something that clearly, particularly republicans in the house really want to push. they're going to use every opportunity that they can. we managed to get some of the tax issues taken off the table at the end of last year. that was difficult for a lot of us to watch. but there's still some questions about spending. that's going to come up in the next couple of months. there's appropriations to be done. i imagine that conversation will keep on going. and i was very worried after i first came back to work after the break, because i said, well, what is this going to do for the immigration agenda? having covered this in the past, i know how much energy it takes from members. but i don't think that the members who are going to be the most involved in the fiscal cliff spending kinds of discussions are the same ones who are going to be pushing on immigration. and as long as you have someone in the senate, like majority leader harry reid, who also wants to move forward, i think you're still going to see some action
in a vacuum. as washington's elected officials and opinion leaders search for common ground on fax policy, fiscal policy, and regulatory regimes, we need to focus on solutions that will support our ability to provide for secure american energy future. there is room for agreement. we welcome president obama's campaign promises to support oil and natural gas development as part of a truly all of the above energy strategy. we can offer solutions to some of the most pressing issues that will impact our economic future tax reform, infrastructure improvement leasing and permitting on federal land, and regulations that don't add unnecessary layers of compliance burden on top of the existing. and ensuring regulations will comprise our ability to grow the economy and create jobs to domestic energy. and there's plenty of work to be done as we all know. our economy has struggled to recover. millions of americans are still out of work, and millions have stopped looking for work all together. agree geopolitical tear -- many americans wonder if washington can work in a bipartisan manner to solve the mo
. he already, by the age of 17, is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas and then president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about, because he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas, he goes to georgetown. and from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for the rhodes fellowship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success
. gore. the going out of the 2000 election with the voter suppression. talk about voter suppression. the commission hasn't ever been the same since that time. he reagan in a sense succeed in making it a body that couldn't listen to ordinary people or that wouldn't listen to ordinary people. and was not independent and they kept trying -- the commissioners appointed felt they should endorse whatever the administration said. i said if you're going to do that, they have cabinet officers and political appointee other the government to do that. your job is to monitor them and to tell the public what they're doing. and to make suggestions for how things should be improved. right now in the most recent election, all the voters suppression activity that took place all across the country and the big debate about it, the civil rights commission should have been at the center of the debate based on the history, experience with voting, and voting rights suppression and making recommendations. it was nowhere to be seen. and so what it is done is subverted the mission it was supposed to have. an
are stepping forward, and you don't have a politic that's even functional enough for actual elected conservatives. >> i am still a believer in a functi fucking two-party system, and it's hard to believe that the republican party is going to march under the especially whenever chris christie comes out, there's a sort of round of applause that he is saying. i can't imagine that they think this is a tenable position, and this leaves the ground work for a position on immigration that's in any way moderate, and how do they go through the next two years? >> the question is whether as governor ed rendell said, you may have 60% in fare of the law, but if only 10% of people who really, really care intensely about it, will make it a single issue, are the opponents? you know, it's not going to go anywhere, and that has been the situation with gun rights is that the only people who care enough to make it a single issue are the gun owners. i'm not sure that's still true, and that will be the thing. >> intensity is critically important, but the other piece of this is money and politics. the fact
, long ways to go. wasunited states of america 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the port -- of the puzzle is to elect pro- choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with our approach was anyway. -- our pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how many times did you need to out -- be asked before you ran? the women had to be asked seven times before they would say yes. and of the men cannot they did not reall
filing paperwork with the federal election commission this week. meanwhile, politoco reports a top aide to democratic senator frank lawsuit enberg called booker "self-absorbed" accusing the mayor of bee trying the democratic party by skipping a run against republican governor chris christie. >>> well, joining me right now we have msnbc contributing and managing editor joy an reid and white house reporter for the "washington post." and with a hello to both of you, david i'm going to go up to you first. let's go to afghanistan with the president accelerating the withdrawal of troops right now. what did we learn from that news conference as to a timeline? >> well, alex, it was very interesting. the words that the president used he kept saying several times not only is the war for americans going to come to an end by the end of 2014, which we all knew, but as soon as this spring america is going to allow the afghan forces around the country to take the lead in securing their own nation. that's moved up the timetable by a few months. what that seems to signal was we may be able to remove the
: what about making republicans more efficient. what happened to you, you lost the election you lost your backbone? >> i don't believe so. i certainly have you. if you are talking about the fiscal cliff, back in 2003 they made tax cuts temporary. they extended the temporary nature come two years but come january 1st income tax was going up. so this was protecting 99% of americans. republicans wanted to protect every american. we didn't want to see taxes increased on anybody. we didn't have that option. all we could do because president obama demanded the taxes were going up for some americans. >> neil: for this whole kubuki theater was silly? >> the house passed extension past august. harry reid refused to bring it up. president owes congress a report because medicare is spending out of the general fund 45% what it is paid for benefits. that required by law and 15 days after he submits a budget he has to submit a report to fix it. four years he hasn't done that. we should be demanding of this president to follow lawsuit on. >> neil: you voted for this cliff deal in the senate. do you thin
in the nation's capitol are deals. it's a place created for one thing. for elected people across this country to come and meet, get to know each other and find a way to direct the country. the working principle is we, the american people, can send people here to do the job, to make things work, to make government of the people, by the people and for the people be just that. the winning congressional passage of the 13th amendment is about washington doing it job. people get squeezed, they get paid off with jobs, in short, they get worked. go see "lincoln" and get a good look at how politics works on the inside. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris, and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, here comes the freakout. the president invites president building a plan of action on guns. it's going to be big. it will have the full force of the obama white house behind it and it's coming as soon as tuesday. the right wing knows what they're heading into. they know they have a fight on their hands, which is
at this just as let's elect more democrats for gun control but the republican party saying why can't we win over votes there, too? you can look back to 1994 when the assault weapons ban was enacted. 46 republicans in the house, one of them, john kasich and a lot changed about the ideological divide between the parties is shaking out and republican primary challenges never more scary and terrifying but can you see getting back to a point when several dozen republican members of the house could actually safely vote for gun control measures? >> you know, i was taken the other day by the comments that phil gingrey said talking about that rape issue and todd akin. also within that, he had said, look, i we should have universal background checks and i worked with phil on some very good veterans issues to get occupational therapists to help the veterans coming home. yes, i do think that you can start to edge down this road in a way that does not not talk to individuals. important to remember in pennsylvania, we have a million individuals that on the hunting day want to go out there and hunt and ma
. three times, tamron. i got elected in the second largest nra membership state by 10%, 12% and 21% of the vote. >> right. >> that was my margin. >> governor rendell, well -- you man up. man up. >> you speak the facts. the title of the recent book, may require a different thing for people to do. i won't say the title of the book. i'll let you if you so choose. we have become a nation of what? >> wussies. >> there you go. thank you very much, and john anne michael. great pleasure volcano you on today. >>> the republicansdy policemen ma. john mccain and others praise senator chuck hagel years ago. we'll take a look at the republican problem there. democratic senator will join us to talk live about the latest on hagel and brennan. >>> protests outside the white house, over john brennan's nomination as cia director. why aren't people talking about the controversy surrounding him more? >> for the american people. >> thank you, america. >> helping people recover and rebuild, this's what we do. >> now, let's bring on tomorrow. >> the ad campaign is called thank you america. that's what ai
the middle class. i just don't see any social policies on the horizon. the election is over, we've heard everything that the candidates had to say. not one said anything intelligent about this is how you rebuild the american middle class. so little tiny book, not all that thick. tells three stories; what doesn't work and why it doesn't work, what does work and why it does work, what could work and how to make it work. >> host: professor gelles, do you come at this from a liberal or a conservative point of view? you mentioned fox news. >> guest: practical. i've worked in policy in washington. i've been a dean of a school of social policy, and i find that purple is my color. and i'm not particularly interested in taking an ideological point of view, i'm interested in results. and the danger of writing a book like this, and i've already discovered it, my extremely liberal friends wish i had never written the book, and my conservative friends wish i didn't want to spend this much of the government's money. if i can tick both sides off and be true to the data, then i've done the work i wanted
as a duly elected member of the assembly today. she continues his work and does honor to his memory. just three months ago, we were proceeding normally with our lives, getting ready for a national election and the holidays to follow. then sandy hit. sandy was the worst storm to strike new jersey in 100 years. 346,000 homes were damaged or destroyed. nearly 7 million people and 1,000 schools had their power knocked out. 116,000 new jerseyans were evacuated or displaced from their homes. 41,000 families are still displaced from their homes. sandy may have damaged our homes and our infrastructure, but it did not destroy our spirit. the people of new jersey have come together as never before -- across party lines, across ideological lines, across ages, races and backgrounds, from all parts of our state, even from out of state. everyone has come together. so today, let me start this address with a set of thank-yous from me on behalf of the great people of this state. first, i want to thank the brave first responders, national guard, and emergency management experts who prepared us for this sto
, it puts a real check and balance. even china which is serving not an elected country, sensitive to public criticism. if you look at the train accident, w.h.o., which is there vision -- version of twitter, ultimately this fellow was seen as a seen as god is now on his way to prison because of corruption. think about the terrible things that go on in the world, the people who were at the whim of the police chief or minority's or the terrible status women are treated in much of the developing world. we will have games. you can out anonymously report them. you can imagine a network were a bad thing is occurring, you reported unanimously. you can build those kinds of networks and data and develop an epic fact that everybody is connected has large numbers of step folks. let's talk about health care. we were talking earlier in the video about 2050 about health care. people sort of snickered when the gentlemen mentioned to us, the fda just approved the first bill that you can swallow that has a digital chip in it that wi-fi is out what is going on in your stomach. to all of us basically would lik
the great midterm election. can you now come back to a party that is less popular than cockroaches? and root canal and tell them you really don't want to do this? >> look, the party has a big political problem that has been -- around for now two years. and it's about how we communicate those very principles and value how we've talked about the economy and how we've talked about evolving everybody in the rehabilitation. that laundry list that you gave earlier is so true. all of those things happens if the government shuts down. but all of those things happen, also, if we continue to spend the way we intend because whether it's today or tomorrow, the bill will come due. the republicans have the opportunity to make the argument to touch on a better management of our government and touch on creating the types of incentives in the economy so that we rely less on government spending and government programs and more on the private sector. >> i think that we're going to have to go, but i think that the spending is not the question that any of us are saying is not a question that we're going to have
's usually not a decision, who is elected, often funeral director, is the one who makes the decision as to manner of death. so, the manner of death-- >> well, wouldn't you speak up? wouldn't you speak up? if a nonprofessional person, an elected official, you know, overrides your medical professional judgment a homicide, to decide like for forever reason this is an accident, wouldn't you speak up? >> absolutely, greta. however, the problem is the coroner hires a pathologist to do the autopsy. the pathologist does the autopsy, says whatever he thinks is appropriate and leaves and then the death certificate is issued by the coroner and the manner of death is issued. well, the pathologist is far away. that happened in the peterson thing, also, remember? there was an issue with the coroner issuing the cause of death rather than the forensic pathologist. >> greta: let me go-- the first death, the car accident, 25 mile per hours about 1999. how did she die? >> the -- that's what the trial was about now, the second death, betty jean. >> greta: the first one though, the car accident. >> the c
assumed or hoped. >>> next, add this one to the list of why republicans missed the whole election. it turns out we're in for this fight again. >> the amendment i bring to the floor tonight would deny any and all funding to planned parenthood and its affiliates for the rest of the fiscal year. >> that was mike pence leading the charge in 2011 to defund planned parenthood. it did not stop with his exit from congress. enter marsha blackburn. she's on the show a lot. and her kickoff this time to the 113th congress. >> we felt like that, to start the year off on the very first day that we would go ahead and get the bill filed. what it does is to defund planned parenthood. it would block their ability to get taxpayer money, and we know that planned parenthood is basically big abortion business. >> there you have it. she's not alone. marsha blackburn's colleague also reintroduced the same bill. planned parenthood president weighed in. quote, they apparently learned nothing from the result of the last election where americans said they do not want politicians dictating women's access to h
their constituents satisfied by bringing home the bacon to get elected. [inaudible] [laughter] >> from the lead to president kennedy played a role in developing nasa and the space program. where were you when you heard the news and what was your impression of his leadership? >> i was at mit, and i thought there's a very positive statement. after i knew what the mercury program had been set as objectives. in april of 611th, what could we do? may 5th ellen shepherd went up and down. several like richard branson's project. it wasn't a flight. 20 days later, the president said we should go to the moon within this decade. a lot of people thought that was in possible. how could we do that? nobody had been in orbit yet in the united states. what kind of rockets are we going to build to be given to do it, and what is the main principle? he was going to build a big spacecraft but we didn't have a rocket to go in. we needed to lift the spacecraft that would do everything. take people up, go to the orbit, land, a comeback and then back into the ocean again. it was a monster. so he needed a rocket for the
. >> a special playoff edition of "ravens report" friday night at 7:30. no one elected to baseball's hall of fame yesterday. >> we will be right back. >> another top honor for marilyn's public school is -- for maryland's public school. >> a trade school closes in baltimore and that leaves students in new place to learn. students in new place to learn.
that president car are sooi stole the last election. just have a listen. >> correctly seen as illegitimate as many afghans and by people around the world. he runs a corrupt regime. his vice president according to these documents had $53 million in cash going to dubai. there is no legitimate explanation for the vice president of a country running off with $53 million. another of these documents appointments out that his half brother is involved in the drug trade. and then there are of course the accounts of karzai himself as being emotional, unstable, suggestions that he uses drugs. >> a lot of allegations there, but i think to the point is whether president karzai can be trusted in a way to run his own country or is he the only game in town, and regardless of troop numbers, there will be billions of dollars needed to run the army that is now being built up by the u.s. and nato. >> that's right. at the nato conference, they pledged to at least ten years of providing beginning $4.1 billion a year, $2.5 billion of that coming from the u.s. but i think it's important for us to recognize as we
iraq war veteran elected to congress. and nia malika henderson, first, let me thank you both for being here tonight. congressman, you've been long for a pullout. we should have never extended it. what's your reaction of speeding up the withdrawal of u.s. troops? >> reverend, today is a great day for the american troops, but also to our country. the fact that the president's been very clear, we're accelerating the fact that we're bringing our troops home. thank goodness. we are shifting to a counter terrorism doctrine. we are bringing our troops home because they did their job. they took out bin laden. the longest war in american history, over ten years time, are coming home. i gave president obama credit because he had the guts to do the right thing. president obama did the right thing for american security and american troops. >> it is to wish that they would have never gone this far and would have to give him credit. when you look at the fact that the numbers behind the afghanistan war is astounding. they are 11.3 years, the cost of the war, $557.3 billion. dead, 2,174, wounded, 17,6
asked today, as well. if mitt romney was selected or elected president and that was the picture of his cabinet, what would be the reaction? >> well, i think we know what the reaction would be. we know what the arguments that were made against mitt romney during the campaign. some of the similar language you see route marcus using in that editorial about "mad men." a 1950s version of america that people sort of accuse mitt romney of having. in some ways, i think if you look at that photo, it sort of suggests the same thing with all of those men as counselors to the president. valerie jarrett there and striking that you can't see her, that she is in the background and all you do see is her leg. >> governor rendell can't stop shaking his head. >> but boy, never in the background -- >> no. but the comment of retro. >> he's ignoring eric holder and the two supreme court justice appointments and napolitano and sebeli sebelius. who's going to implement the health care bill? >> what about charlie rangel with the harsh words? here's an african-american leader. you're not buying it? >> no, no. l
. newly elected senator elizabeth warren called the idea of suing the government outrageous, saying aig was, quote, biting the hand that fed them. public relations blunder came at a particularly bad time for the company which was looking to remake its image with a series of ads titled "thank you america." >> the leading global insurance company based right here in america. >> we've repaid every dollar america lent to us. >> everything, plus a profit of more than $22 billion. >> for the american people. >> thank you, america. >> helping people recover and rebuild. that's what we do. now let's bring on tomorrow. >> so they just rolled out those ads a week ago and then came out and threatened to sue the government. >> and on twitter, what we were asking yesterday, what would elizabeth warren do, is now becoming a, i don't know -- >> a hash tag? >> yes. exactly. >> that's huge. >> what's the "i" for in aig, ingrate? >> they are not joining the lawsuit. editorial page of "the wall street journal" suggests that aig probably did the right thing by not joining the lawsuit, but it doesn't mean t
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